Archive for the ‘Hardware’ Category

Engineers construct 220 million pixel computer display
August 25, 2007

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have constructed the highest-resolution computer display in the world – with a screen resolution up to 220 million pixels.

The system located at the UCSD division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) is also linked via optical fiber to Calit2’s building at UC Irvine, which boasts the previous record holder. The combination – known as the Highly Interactive Parallelized Display Space (HIPerSpace) – can deliver real-time rendered graphics simultaneously across 420 million pixels to audiences in Irvine and San Diego.

“We don’t intend to stop there,” said Falko Kuester, Calit2 professor for visualization and virtual reality and associate professor of structural engineering in UCSD’s Jacobs School of Engineering. “HIPerSpace provides a unique environment for visual analytics and cyberinfrastructure research and we are now seeking funding to double the size of the system at UC San Diego alone to reach half a billion pixels with a one gigapixel distributed display in sight.”

Kuester is the chief architect of the systems deployed in both Calit2 buildings. Until last week, UC Irvine’s Highly Interactive Parallelized Display Wall (HIPerWall) – built in 2005 with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) – held the record of 200 million pixels for a tiled display system. It is located in the Calit2 Center of Graphics, Visualization and Imaging Technology (GRAVITY), which Kuester directs. When Kuester’s group moved to UCSD in 2006 they began work on the next generation of massively tiled display walls, which now serve as a prototype for ultra-high resolution OptIPortal tiled displays developed by the NSF-funded OptIPuter project (led by Calit2 director Larry Smarr).

The new HIPerSpace system between Irvine and San Diego is joined together via high-performance, dedicated optical networking that clocks in at up to two gigabits per second (2Gbps). The systems use the same type of graphics rendering technology, from industry partner NVIDIA. The “graphics super cluster” being developed at……. Read the full Article from the source: physorg.com

Engineers construct 220 million pixel computer display
August 25, 2007

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have constructed the highest-resolution computer display in the world – with a screen resolution up to 220 million pixels.

The system located at the UCSD division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) is also linked via optical fiber to Calit2’s building at UC Irvine, which boasts the previous record holder. The combination – known as the Highly Interactive Parallelized Display Space (HIPerSpace) – can deliver real-time rendered graphics simultaneously across 420 million pixels to audiences in Irvine and San Diego.

“We don’t intend to stop there,” said Falko Kuester, Calit2 professor for visualization and virtual reality and associate professor of structural engineering in UCSD’s Jacobs School of Engineering. “HIPerSpace provides a unique environment for visual analytics and cyberinfrastructure research and we are now seeking funding to double the size of the system at UC San Diego alone to reach half a billion pixels with a one gigapixel distributed display in sight.”

Kuester is the chief architect of the systems deployed in both Calit2 buildings. Until last week, UC Irvine’s Highly Interactive Parallelized Display Wall (HIPerWall) – built in 2005 with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) – held the record of 200 million pixels for a tiled display system. It is located in the Calit2 Center of Graphics, Visualization and Imaging Technology (GRAVITY), which Kuester directs. When Kuester’s group moved to UCSD in 2006 they began work on the next generation of massively tiled display walls, which now serve as a prototype for ultra-high resolution OptIPortal tiled displays developed by the NSF-funded OptIPuter project (led by Calit2 director Larry Smarr).

The new HIPerSpace system between Irvine and San Diego is joined together via high-performance, dedicated optical networking that clocks in at up to two gigabits per second (2Gbps). The systems use the same type of graphics rendering technology, from industry partner NVIDIA. The “graphics super cluster” being developed at……. Read the full Article from the source: physorg.com

Via announces one-watt processor
August 25, 2007

Via Technologies has unveiled its 500MHz Eden CPU which it claims is the most power-efficient x86 processor yet produced.

The new chip draws a single watt of power when in use, and just 0.1 watt when idle, and joins Via’s ultra-low voltage processor family designed primarily for ultra-mobile applications.

Because of its very low power draw the CPU does not require a fan, reducing the power requirements even further and opening up design options for developers.

Richard Brown, vice president of corporate marketing at Via, claimed that Eden’s design “defines our ‘small is beautiful’ strategy” and “provides a way for embedded developers to push the market forward”.

The new processor is powerful enough to run portable media devices and UMPCs, while still enabling system platforms to maintain a maximum power drain of less than 10 watts, greatly improving battery life.

Eden will be showcased at the Embedded System Conference in Taipei on 23-24 August 2007 along with several customer boards.

Written by: an Williams, vnunet.com

Fujitsu’s ‘Nanohole’ Tech Could Triple Hard Drive Capacity
August 11, 2007

Last November, we reported on Fujitsu’s efforts to overcome a curious problem with the physics of hard disk drives: storing magnetic data at densities that are smaller than the grains of the underlying ferromagnetic medium should physically allow. The company’s solution involved a combination of lasers to locate precise locations on the drive, and also to pre-heat data spots to make them more conducive to holding data at precise locations.

But all that assumes that the precise locations in question…already exist. Yesterday, we learned from Fujitsu how they intend to accomplish that, and we also got a peek at some areal density goals.

The problem facing HDD engineers has been that perpendicular recording – the process that has already led us to the one-terabyte era for desktop storage – can only go so far. Even higher-capacity drives will be needed soon, not for storing spreadsheets but for serving media…unless CE manufacturers expect every digital home in the 2010s decade to drive their own SANs.Fujitsu’s next big idea literally came from those aluminum “hologram” stickers you frequently see on the front of cereal boxes, and the certification tape of sealed software cases. Making those pretty colors onto aluminum uses a process called anodization, which is a kind of electrolytic “washing” that leaves pits beneath its surface. The non-pitted regions become oxidized to form what’s called alumina.

This pitting can change the color of aluminum, but it also increases its corrosion resistance. The size of those pits has already been known to be “nanoscale.” What if the location of those pits could be predetermined, so a manufacturing process could place pits in an exact arrangement? Then those pits could be exploited for use as bits, in the data sense. Read the full post from the Beta news

AMD’s War with Intel Becomes a Street Brawl
August 4, 2007

The war between Intel and AMD this week became almost entirely rhetorical, following the European Commission’s action last week, charging Intel with abuse of its dominant power status on that continent. While US antitrust law holds companies to a higher standard of conduct once they have attained monopoly power through non-illegal means, EU law sets the bar somewhat lower, where the test is dominant power.

But just what is dominant power, legally speaking? A Wall Street Journal editorial last Tuesday raised the question. It’s easy to call Intel’s 80% market share there “dominant;” but the article asked, why should a company expect to compete its little heart out using any means necessary, until it reaches 80% or some such point, after which time it can no longer be allowed to compete the same way?
“This leaves companies in the absurd position of being free to compete as hard as possible until they reach a certain market share – at which point their hitherto legal behavior becomes unlawful.”

That got AMD’s blood boiling. In a response statement, AMD’s Executive Vice President for Legal Affairs Thomas McCoy said, “Here’s where the history of American antitrust law comes in. In the 2004 Trinko decision, Justice Scalia made a careful distinction: Mere monopoly status is not illegal. But the use of anticompetitive conduct to gain or to maintain a monopoly is illegal, because such practices block the dynamic potential of competition.

This is the distinction employed by the European authorities in their statement of objections against Intel. They did not base their case merely on the size and success of Intel. Rather, the authorities concluded that Intel waged a sustained campaign to leverage its monopoly status to coerce computer makers into boycotting AMD.

“Thus, as the European Commission explained, Intel’s conduct is ‘bad for competition and consumers,”‘ McCoy continued. “And that’s exactly the kind of conclusion that justified the century of landmark U.S. antitrust decisions spanning the decades from Standard Oil, through Alcoa and AT&T, to Microsoft.”

It’s important to note here that the European Commission has not actually reached a conclusion – not in the legal sense – about Intel’s conduct. It can only reach a conclusion after it has given Intel a chance to make its case heard at an oral hearing, which Intel has indicated it wishes to do.

Equally important is the fact that the EC, time and again with various antitrust and competitiveness cases, has chosen to distinguish itself from US antitrust law by saying it does not borrow EU statutes from US code. Much of the EC’s incentive for pursuing Microsoft over the past few years is believed to have been sparked by that company’s settlement with the US Justice Dept., after a district court judgment that would have seen the company broken in two, fell apart.

But AMD’s rhetoric didn’t end there this week. Yesterday, the company released what it claimed to be an economic study concluding that Intel “extracted monopoly profits” from the sale of microprocessors worldwide, during the ten-year period between 1996 and 2006, estimated at $60 billion.

AMD released a summary of a report from Dr. Michael Williams of ERS Group, which includes the…. Read it all from the source : Beta news

Apple Files New Wi-Fi iPod Patents
July 14, 2007

 

Apple may be close to developing a Wi-Fi enabled iPod as a new patent application submitted recently by the company indicates it is developing a way for devices to talk to each other through a wireless network.
First reported by Macsimum News on Thursday, the patent sounds quite similar to what Microsoft is already doing with the Zune. There has been much speculation about the release of a Wi-Fi enabled device, however none have surfaced as of yet.

While Apple’s iPhone does include Wi-Fi, it still must connect directly with its host computer to download songs, update data, and so forth.While mobile devices can do this already, “it is advantageous to exchange (send and/or receive) media or other types of data with other electronic devices in a wireless manner,” Apple claims in its application.

It should be mentioned that Apple has already filed for several patents surrounding Wi-Fi technology in iPod-like devices, so this application could be just the latest in a series of them, and not necessarily an indication that such a device is imminent.

However, last year Apple filed for several patents that ultimately pointed to the release of the iPhone.

Written By: Ed Oswald, BetaNews

Wii outsells PS3 ‘six to one’ in Japan
July 9, 2007

Nintendo sold 270,974 Wii consoles last month while Sony sold 41,628 PS3s, according to Enterbrain, a Japanese publisher that tracks console sales.

Nintendo has sold about 2.76m Wii consoles in Japan since the launch last December, while Sony has sold 970,270 PS3s since it debuted last November.

About 17,616 Xbox 360 consoles were sold in June.

Last week, Phil Harrison, PlayStation’s head of worldwide studios, told US Game Informer magazine that pundits should not judge the success of the console based on the launch software line-up.

Struggled

He said: “You only have to go back to the games that launched PlayStation 1 and Playstation 2.

“If you took those few dozen titles and analysed them, you would never have imagined that either of those formats would have on to sell over 100m units each.”

Globally, Sony has struggled so far to replicate the success it had with the first two PlayStation consoles.

The machine has also suffered from a lack of “killer” exclusive titles which showcase the power of the machine.

PlayStation fans are still awaiting some of the biggest franchises on the machine to emerge, such as Metal Gear Solid, Killzone 2 and Gran Turismo.

Written by: BBC News 

LG’s Google Phone Coming to Europe
June 23, 2007

The Korea Times is reporting that LG Electronics has unveiled their new cell phone which offers a full range of services provided by Google, or as us bloggers like to call it, the Google Phone.

The Google Phone (LG-KU580) is expected to hit the European markets this week and cost about $350.

The LG-KU580 will be the first phone on the market to specifically deliver GMail, Google Search, and Google Maps in one easy to use interface.

Other add-ons include an MP3 player, FM radio and a two inch display panel.

“Google’s strong search services are just one click away with our phone as we put a hot key that directs users to Google services in a fraction of a second,” Choi Je-wook of LG told the Korea Times. “In addition, the phone provides other Google services such as e-mail (G-Mail) and map-viewing (Google Earth).”

Written by: Loren Baker, search engine journal 

Apple Posts 20-Minute iPhone Tour
June 23, 2007

Apple on Friday provided the most in-depth look at the iPhone, one week before the device debuts at AT&T and Apple stores across the United States. A 20-minute guided tour posted to the company’s Web site showcases the various features of the iPhone and explains how to use the touch screen.

While the tour doesn’t disclose anything major that hasn’t been announced, it does provide the first look at the iPhone’s usability and innovative features like visual voicemail and SMS text messaging that works like an iChat session. The built-in iPod functionality is also demonstrated, and the included headphones include a microphone as well. According to the video, the iPhone’s built in mail client will support Microsoft Office Word and Excel documents.

Written by: BetaNews

AMD to introduce 45nm process AM3 CPU family in 2H08
June 23, 2007

AMD schedules to launch its 45nm process socket AM3 family processors in the second half of 2008. The processors will support HyperTransport 3.0 and will have a built-in DDR2/DDR3 memory controller. The processors will be backward compatible with the previous AM2 and AM2+ socket motherboards, according to sources at motherboard makers.

AMD’s AM3 family will include the quad-core Deneb and DenebFX, dual-core Propus and Regor, and single-core Sargas. Shipments of 45nm products are predicted to surpass those of 65nm products within half a year from launch, noted the sources.

Although Socket AM3 processors will be backwards compatible with previous socket AM2 and AM2+ motherboards, socket AM3 motherboards will not be able to support the previous socket AM2 and AM2+ processors. Therefore shipment volumes of socket AM3 motherboards will depend on the speed of transition to DDR3 memory, added the sources.

 

Written by: Monica Chen, Taipei; Joseph Tsai, DIGITIMES 

Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000 (1 Terabyte) Hard Drive review
June 23, 2007

The terabyte race for consumer desktop hard drives has been on for a long time, now the first generation of drives is here. On April 25th, Hitachi announced that it would begin shipping the Deskstar 7K1000, their latest series of consumer hard drives, weighting in at 750GB and a monstrous 1000GB (1TB). The 1TB version which we are reviewing today is slated at $399, a serious price tag for this colossal amount of storage.The Deskstar 7K1000 represents a milestone for Hitachi and for the hard drive industry as a whole, as it is the first drive to offer a 1 terabyte capacity. Honestly, I expected that it would be Seagate who would deliver the first 1TB hard drive since they were the first to reach the 500GB mark. However, Hitachi has not simply grabbed five 200GB platters and stuck them together to create a 1TB hard drive. Rather, there is much more to the Deskstar 7K1000, such as its Serial ATA II interface and the massive 32MB memory buffer. This is also the first desktop Hitachi drive to feature PMR technology (Perpendicular Magnetic Recording).

Perpendicular recording is said to deliver up to 10x the storage density of longitudinal recording, on the same recording media. There was some interest in using the system in floppy disks in the 1980s, but the technology was never reliable. Today, there is renewed interest in using it for hard drives, which are rapidly reaching their fundamental limits.

Current hard disk technology with longitudinal recording has an estimated limit of 100 to 200GB per square inch due to the superparamagnetic effect, though this estimate is constantly changing. Perpendicular recording is predicted to allow information densities of up to around 1TB/sq. inch.

Depending on how you see it, this 1TB Hitachi is realistically a 935.5 GB hard drive. Operating systems such as Windows use the binary approach to measure capacity. Hard drive manufacturers measure capacity using a decimal system instead, which means a single kilobyte equals 1000 bytes (the binary approach measures one kilobyte to equal 1024 bytes). Hard drive manufacturers have been using the decimal system as a form of advertising because it allows them to claim larger capacities. The issue of whether or not this is ethical can be argued, but these days it has just been accepted the way things are.

Windows shows the capacity of the Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 500GB hard drive to be just 457.2 GBs, which means two of these drives would actually offer slightly less capacity than a single Hitachi 1TB drive. However, two Seagate 500GB hard drives cost just $300, making them considerably cheaper than a single 1TB drive, and given that two drives should be faster than one, which configuration is really the way to go?

With this mindset we can start to play the different possible scenarios, for example, the obvious advantage of having a larger single drive is that there is less room required inside the computer’s case, and only one SATA port needs to be used. There is also less heat produced and less power required. Another important consideration is that one hard drive is much quieter than having two or more. For Small Form Factor (SFF) and Home Theatre Personal Computers (HTPC) where space is tight, a large single hard drive can be invaluable.

Then again, two main negatives for owning a large single drive is that if it dies, all the data will go with it down the drain, and of course as we have covered, you do pay a price premium for having one large hard drive.

See the full Performances tests in the source:  TechSpot

New MacBook Pro Offers a Dazzling Display
June 23, 2007

What a difference 540,000 pixels make.

I’m talking in this case about the latest MacBook Pro to grace my desk, the top-of-the-line 17-in. model with a glossy 1,920-by-1,200-pixel high-resolution screen tricked out with a 7,200-rpm 160GB hard drive and 4GB of RAM added post-purchase. Oh, and it uses Intel’s new 2.4-GHz Core 2 Duo with a “Santa Rosa” chip set for a bit more zip and even slightly longer battery life.

But it’s the screen that’s the most appealing feature. This is without a doubt the best-looking LCD screen Apple has produced in what also happens to be the fastest laptop from the company yet.

In a word: suh-weet.

Of course, it should be, given the price: The basic 17-in. MacBook Pro (MBP from here on in) starts at $2,799. The hi-res display adds another $100, and the optional 7,200-rpm Seagate Momentus hard drive tacks on $150 more. The result is a seriously sick machine. That’s sick as in wicked good. Cost out the door? $3,049, before taxes and shipping–and worth every penny.

High Res Screen Envy

For the record, I hadn’t planned on buying a new MBP this year–the last-generation 2.33-GHz model I got in November was doing just fine–until I saw that Apple had added the hi-res screen option when it introduced the latest iteration on June 5. I’ve vowed ever since I bought a Sony Vaio with the same resolution screen almost two years ago that if Apple ever released such a laptop, I’d get one forthwith. So I found a buyer for my “old” MBP and promptly ordered the new one from Apple on the same day it were announced. Six days later, it was here. I’ve been using it ever since, with nary an issue.

Oh, and did I mention that screen? You know the difference between regular TV and high-def TV? That’s what it feels like using this model. Not that the standard screen offered by Apple is a slouch; 1,680-by-1,050 pixels is plenty fine for most users. But for those of us who always want faster, bigger, more, Apple has created what I’d call the MBP Ultimate.

See also: Resolution Debate, Battery Life, Gaming Speed

Writen by: Ken Mingis, Macworld

iPhone Delivers Up to Eight Hours of Talk Time
June 19, 2007

Apple® today announced that iPhone™ will deliver significantly longer battery life when it ships on June 29 than was originally estimated when iPhone was unveiled in January. iPhone will feature up to 8 hours of talk time, 6 hours of Internet use, 7 hours of video playback or 24 hours of audio playback.* In addition, iPhone will feature up to 250 hours-more than 10 days-of standby time. Apple also announced that the entire top surface of iPhone, including its stunning 3.5-inch display, has been upgraded from plastic to optical-quality glass to achieve a superior level of scratch resistance and optical clarity.”With 8 hours of talk time, and 24 hours of audio playback, iPhone’s battery life is longer than any other ‘Smartphone’ and even longer than most MP3 players,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “We’ve also upgraded iPhone’s entire top surface from plastic to optical-quality glass for superior scratch resistance and clarity. There has never been a phone like iPhone, and we can’t wait to get this truly magical product into the hands of customers starting just 11 days from today.”

iPhone introduces an entirely new user interface based on a revolutionary multi-touch display and pioneering new software that allows users to control iPhone with just a tap, flick or pinch of their fingers. iPhone combines three products into one small and lightweight handheld device-a revolutionary mobile phone, a widescreen iPod, and the Internet in your pocket with best-ever applications on a mobile phone for email, web browsing and maps. iPhone ushers in an era of software power and sophistication never before seen in a mobile device, which completely redefines what users can do on their mobile phones.

Pricing and Availability

iPhone will be available in the US on June 29, 2007 in a 4GB model for $499 (US) and an 8GB model for $599 (US), and will work with either a PC or Mac®. iPhone will be sold in the US through Apple’s retail and online stores, and through AT&T’s select retail stores.

*All Battery claims are dependent upon network configuration and many other factors; actual results may vary. See http://www.apple.com/batteries for more information. Music capacity is based on four minutes per song and 128-Kbps AAC encoding; actual capacity varies by content.

About Apple

Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh. Today, Apple continues to lead the industry in innovation with its award-winning computers, OS X operating system and iLife and professional applications. Apple is also spearheading the digital media revolution with its iPod portable music and video players and iTunes online store, and will enter the mobile phone market this year with its revolutionary iPhone.

© 2007 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Mac, Mac OS, Macintosh and iPhone are trademarks of Apple. Other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Written by: PRNewswire

Sony Ericsson shows shake-to-shuffle Walkman phone
June 17, 2007

Sony Ericsson’s been busy, busy, busy this week: in addition to announcing an upgraded Cyber-shot camera phone, it debuted a pair of new Walkman music phones – once controlled simply by shaking, rattling or rolling it.

Sony Ericsson Walkman 960
Sony Ericsson’s W960: Symbian runner

What really makes the W960 stand out is its foundation on the Symbian operating system – it’s smart phone as music phone – complete with 240 x 320, 262,144-colour touch screen, stylus and jog dial as per Sony Ericsson’s P-series smart phones.

Likewise, it has Wi-Fi on board and the Opera web browser pre-loaded. For cellular connectivity, it has tri-band GSM/GPRS and 3G radios.

It’s a more traditionally styled, black model, and comes bundled with a Bluetooth stereo headset. There’s a 3.2-megapixel camera on board and 8GB of memory. Like the W910 it has an RDS-capable FM radio.

All three handsets are due to arrive in the shops in Q4.

Written by: the Register, Tony Smith

Sony CEO Howard Stringer Studying, Refining PS3 Price
June 17, 2007

Sir Howard Stringer commends Nintendo on Wii’s “cheaper” business model

The issue of the PlayStation 3’s price tag is one that refuses to go away, at least until it is on-par with a competing console.

Sony executives have had a couple different stances on the topic. In the western world, SCEA CEO Jack Tretton said that PS3 will be “difficult to cost reduce” due to its expensive components. Phil Harrison of Sony Computer Entertainment Worldwide Studios said that he was feeling “absolutely no pressure at all” to drop the price of the PlayStation 3.

In Japan, Sony Senior Vice President Takao Yuhara said the company may look at price as part of its strategy to “expand the market.” Sony president Ryoji Chubachi said in April that the company was “in the midst of revisiting our strategy for the PS3,” which he later reiterated again in another recorded statement during June.

Regardless of what the true near-future fate of the PS3’s price point, there is a clearly communicated sentiment from the Japanese side of the company that realizes a sensitive issue in the eyes of consumers.

The latest affirmation on Sony’s attention to the price of its latest console comes from the very top: Sir Howard Stringer, the chairman and CEO of Sony Corp. In an interview with the Financial Times, Stringer said of the PS3 price cuts, “That is what we are studying at the moment. That’s what we are trying to refine.”

While Stringer’s comments do not make any direct indication of a price drop, it signals that Sony is not blind to the views of its customers. Stringer also said he expected “energy [in PS3 sales] by Christmas, and then you will begin to see break-out games.”

Stringer also commended Nintendo on its successful business model, not only because of its controller, but because of its relatively affordable price point. “Nintendo Wii has been a successful enterprise, and a very good business model, compared with ours … because it’s cheaper,” Mr. Stringer said.

Written by:  DailyTech

Sony Ericsson intros 5Mp Cyber-shot phone
June 15, 2007

Sony Ericsson Cyber-shot K850
Sony Ericsson’s K850: 5Mp snapper

Sony Ericsson is to beef up its line of Cyber-shot camera phones with a new five-megapixel model, but you’re going to have to wait until nearly Christmas to get your hands on it.

The K850 is set to go on sale early in Q4 – October, basically. When it arrives, it will not only sport that higher-resoution image grabber but also a xenon flash, auto-focus, 16x digital zoom and a 2.2in, 320 x 240, 262,144-colour display. It also has 3G connectivity with HSDPA high-speed download technology. Sony Ericsson claimed the camera can upload at HSDPA speeds too – does it have HSUPA (High Speed Uplink Packet Access) on board? If it does, that’s not an abbreviation the company mentioned.

Once again, Sony Ericsson’s Best Pic feature – it takes nine shots in rapid succession, as soon as you touch the shutter key; when it’s done, you keep the one you prefer – is present, as is the ability to send images directly to a PictBridge printer, and to tweak shots first.

The phone has 40MB of memory on board, backed by a bundled 512MB Memory Stick Micro – aka M2 – card. However, the K850 can also accept Micro SD cards in the same slot. Bluetooth 2.0 is part of package too, and the phone boasts an RDS-capable FM radio.

Written by: The Register Hardware

SanDisk inks agreement to support DivX
June 15, 2007

DivX and SanDisk have announced a licensing agreement allowing SanDisk to include DivX technology in SanDisk’s Sansa line of video-enabled products.

As a result of the partnership, future SanDisk video products can include interoperability with the DivX Stage6 video website. This partnership is designed to provide SanDisk consumers with seamless access to the growing library of professional and user-generated video content available today in the popular DivX format, according to the companies.

Products that bear the DivX Certified logo have undergone a rigorous testing program to ensure a high-quality DivX media experience, including reliable video playback, interoperability with other DivX Certified devices and the visual quality users expect from DivX.

SanDisk expects to announce plans later this year for DivX support in its product lines.

 

 News source: DigiTimes

Toshiba To Speed Up Flash Memory Expansion
June 13, 2007

Japan’s Toshiba plans to speed up its flash memory expansion plans and boost production capacity by 70 percent by June 2008, six months ahead of schedule.

Toshiba, the world’s second-largest maker of NAND flash chips, and its U.S. partner SanDisk will push forward ramp-ups at a 600 billion yen ($4.9 billion) plant under construction in western Japan, Toshiba spokesman Keisuke Omori said on Tuesday.

Ramping up capacity and driving down production costs is imperative for Toshiba, which is hurrying to catch up to top NAND maker South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. as chip price falls level off and present attractive margins.

Toshiba had originally planned to boost monthly capacity at its newest plant, expected to go online in October-December, to process 67,500 units of cost-efficient 300-mm wafers by October-December 2008.

Toshiba now plans to move that time table forward by about six months and its total monthly capacity would hit 260,000 wafers a month by June 2008, up 70 percent from the end of March.

Toshiba shares rose as much as 2.7 percent to 968 yen, passing a 7-year high logged in May. The stock was up 1.1 percent at 953 yen at the end of morning trade, compared to the benchmark Nikkei average which fell 0.36 percent.

News source: CRN

Apple and YouTube Alliance
June 2, 2007

apple tv youtube

In addition of having the ability to play movies, TV shows, music, photos, and podcasts, the Apple TV will soon to have another superman power – search and play YouTube videos on your big screen.

Coming in June, you can watch YouTube videos in a whole new way — on the big screen. Enjoy thousands of free videos, including the top featured, most viewed, and top rated. New content will be added every day and the entire YouTube catalog will be available by the fall, so there’ll always be something cool to see.

Can’t wait to June? Connect your computer to your TV. I have been enjoying YouTube videos on my TV for so long that I can’t even remember how long it’s been! 🙂

By Googlified

80GB PlayStation 3 Bound for South Korea
May 21, 2007

According to official information posted on the PlayStation Korea website, the territory will be getting an 80GB hard drive inside the PS3 when it launches June 16. Neither the 20 GB nor the 60 GB PS3 consoles will be available in South Korea. Aside from the 80 GB hard drive, the hardware of the Korea-bound PS3 is identical the European model – which also means software-based, instead of hardware-based, backwards compatibility. A spokesperson for Sony Computer Entertainment Europe noted “the chassis of the 80GB Korean PlayStation 3 is identical to the chassis of the European version. The only exception is the larger hard drive. At this moment in time, there are no plans to introduce the 80GB version of PlayStation 3 in Europe.” Sony Computer Entertainment America has yet to provide comment on the 80 GB PlayStation 3 announcement.

News source: DailyTech

Review about is my Phone
May 17, 2007

Sony Ericsson k810i

 

Sony Ericsson k810i

Sony Ericsson’s latest Cyber-shot handset is a photo-fanatic’s best friend, cramming in a 3.2 megapixel camera with auto-focus and a top-notch Xenon flash, as well as super-smart editing features.

 

Packing Sony Ericsson’s Photofix software, the K810i lets you tweak pictures to your heart’s content, without ever offloading them onto a desktop computer.

Once you’ve snapped a quality image, it’s a piece of cake to fiddle with light balance, boost your photo’s colour levels and even remove red-eye with software built into the handset.

Taking the best picture in the first place is a doddle too, thanks to Sony Ericsson’s BestPic technology. Click the shutter and the K810i will take several photos at once, letting you pick the best of the bunch to keep for good.

You can even upload photos straight from the handset to a Blogger page, or print to a USB printer with the included cable.

Photos from the K810i look so crisp you’ll doubt they came from a camera phone, while the built-in Xenon flash makes it an essential companion for trigger-happy photo fiends keen to keep snapping after dark.

Storing high-resolution images on a mobile phone is usually painfully slow, but the K810i’s Memory Stick M2 makes saving files a super-slick affair, and you can pop in extra cards without switching off the phone, so you’ll never run out of space for your photos.

The memory card can store music and videos too, and with A2DP stereo Bluetooth, the K810i’s equipped to work with the latest wireless earphones.

Built in TrackID software will also please music lovers. Hold the K810i up to a speaker, and the software will identify the song and artist playing, so you’ll never struggle to hunt down a killer track again.

For music, movies and the ultimate in mobile phone photography, the K810i has to be on your shopping list. Snapping precious images has never been so simple, or so satisfying.

The writer: T3 Mag